Je ne suis qu'une vermine bourrée d'esthétique. Rien de plus.

what’s amazing to me is that ppl still manage to ship yachi with dudes in spite of her, yknow, never showing interest in any dudes but alright do your thing keep ignoring her drooling over kiyoko and saeko in favor of baseless ships like yamayachi or kageyachi you’re not transparent at all

erikkwakkel:

Sleeping beauties

Resting, that is what these old books appear to be doing. And they deserve it. The volumes date from the 17th and 18th centuries and have been on these shelves for several hundreds of years. They are part of York Cathedral Library and occupy a packed room (Pic 5) just adjacent to a larger reading room. When I visited the place, last week, I found myself whispering and walking slowly, so as not to wake them. These images transmit, I hope, some of the magic that hangs in the air: the red and green shine of leather bindings mixed with the distinct musky smell of old books.

Pics (my own): York Minster Library, established precisely 600 years ago this year. More about the library here.

lavandula:

jil sander s.s 99

sixdora:

Johan

"…we know nothing about Sappho. Or worse: everything we know is wrong. Even the most basic “facts” are simply not so, or in need of a stringent critical reexamination. A single example. We are told over and over again that Sappho “was married to Kerkylas of Andros, who is never mentioned in any of the extant fragments of her poetry” (Snyder 1989:3). Not surprising, since it’s a joke name: he’s Dick Allcock from the Isle of MAN. It’s been over 139 years since William Mure pointed this out… yet one finds this piece of information repeated without question from book to book, usually omitting the dubious source, usually omitting any reference at all."

Holt Parker, ‘Sappho Schoolmistress’, Transactions of the American Philological Association 123 (1993)

80s-90s-supermodels:

"Paris: Seasonal Perfection", Harper’s Bazaar US, April 1990
Photographer : Phillip Dixon
Model : Naomi Campbell

likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Joust

erikkwakkel:

Funny medieval doodles

With their wild hair and frantic gaze, these doodled men look like fools. They are waving as if to seek contact with the reader. The thing is, the reader is busy singing and listening to a sermon. That is because these 800-year-old images are found in a Missal, a book used during Holy Mass. What a shock it must have been for the serious user of the book, to flip the page and suddenly find yourself face to face with these funny creatures. And what a great contrast: a serious book with silly drawings.

Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, MS 95 (Missal, 12th century). More about the manuscript here.

"Even in play, to affirm that the exertion of power over powerlessness is erotic, is empowering, is to set the emotional and social stage for the continuation of that relationship politically, socially, and economically."

Audre Lorde, A Burst of Light (Essays)

Ary Scheffer x Nan Goldin

RF